2004 Volume 5 Number 2

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    "Mi experiencia en el Japón": Peruvian Nikkei Creating Meaning from Transnational Experiences
    (Latin American Studies Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 2004-12-15) Locklin, Blake Seana
    This article analyzes the search for identity and community in essays written for a Peruvian contest on the theme “Mi experiencia en el Japón: Una lección de vida." I argue that the texts show complex relationships among ethnicity, nationality, language, and class as the authors consider the effect of their time in Japan on themselves and their communities. Peruvians of Japanese descent, the nikkei, write of their suffering and alienation whereas a non-nikkei finds inspiration for Peru’s future in Japan. All the authors try to reconcile an ideal of global citizenship with their individual experiences of difference.
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    Telling Trials: Whodunit and How's It Told? The Belsunce and Patton Cases, Argentina and Australia
    (Latin American Studies Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 2004-12-15) Munro, Andrew
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    Faith in a Changing Mexico: The Effects of Religion on Political Attitudes, Engagement, and Participation
    (Latin American Studies Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 2004-12-15) Patterson, Eric
    Since about 1970 between fifteen and twenty-five percent of the populations of various Latin American countries have converted to Protestantism. This ‘neo-Reformation’ seems to have the power to reshape not only the spiritual experience, but also the social, political, and economic lives of its adherents. Mexico has long been conservative about religion, but even there the role of religion in society is changing. For instance, after a six decade hiatus, the Mexican government has recently allowed the Catholic Church to re-enter the public sphere, while during the past decade the number of Mexican Protestants has doubled and will likely double again by 2010. Thus, in a time of rapid political, economic, and social change, Mexican society is experiencing a religious pluralism unknown in the past. Do different religions result in different politics? The findings suggest that religious variables do influence political attitudes, engagement, and participation in Mexico.
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    "Ema, la cautiva" de César Aira: la tradición y su superación
    (Latin American Studies Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 2004-12-15) Pensa, Mariana
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    An Interview with Norman Schwartz
    (Latin American Studies Program, University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 2004-12-15) Schwartz, Norman